Is it Time for a Tech Detox?

Jun 16, 2012

Is it Time for a Tech Detox?

Is this you?  5 signs you might be in need of an unplugged vacation, and soon…

1.    The first thing you do when you wake up and the last thing you do before you go to bed is check your inbox, just in case.

2.    Your Smartphone goes everywhere with you (even the bathroom).

3.    You interact with your kids more via Facebook than at the dinner table.

4.    You’ve fallen off a treadmill mid-text.

5.    You talk to Siri more than your spouse.

If you answered yes to any of the above, keep reading.

 

Why You Need to Disconnect Now and Take an Unplugged Vacation

For most of us, our day begins by sorting through a ridiculous amount of emails (the average person receives 100 messages per day!).  Then, there is the phone ringing and buzzing everywhere we go because it’s now attached to us and “on” 24/7.  In between the non-stop emails, texts and calls we’re also compelled to check Facebook and Twitter (like every hour) just to pretend we have a social life. Then, the evening arrives and it’s time to unwind.  But what do we do?  We pick up our Kindle or Nook and stare at yet another screen.  That’s if we’ve actually managed to pull ourselves away from the laptop or iPad for an hour or two, right?

All of that connectedness is wreaking havoc on our health.  We’re seconds away from a major meltdown and we don’t even know it!

Ok, that might be a bit dramatic, but the truth is, our minds need a break from time to time.  We’re not programmed to be “on” all the time, and yet this is how most of us are operating.  And because we’re always “on,” we’re more stressed, less rested and often frazzled (a nicer way of saying CRAZY).

If you’re nodding your head because you can relate to everything above, then it’s time to stash all of your devices away and go on a technology-free adventure.  Yes, it sounds crazy, but we can disconnect for more than an hour, or even a day, without losing our jobs, our friends or our minds.  In fact, an unplugged vacation is the ultimate gift we can give ourselves.  Here’s why…

Benefits of an unplugged vacation

The benefits of an unplugged vacation

First of all, time away from the daily grind (and the Smartphones, iPads, laptops you’re leaving behind) works wonders on our overall health and well-being.  It gives our bodies a chance to recharge and our minds the opportunity to unwind and decompress like we didn’t even know was possible.   Good-bye stress, hello great mood.

Not only that, you’ll have more energy than you know what do with.  Yes, you actually feel like hiking after a day of rafting. Where did that come from?  Could it be, sleep?

Let’s talk sleep.  When’s the last time you had a really good, perfect, deep rest kind of night?  Sleep is one of the biggest factors in maintaining our health, but it seems to be the easiest to neglect. We go through many of our days and weeks in zombie mode, exhausted from lack of sleep.  And guess what, often times there’s a direct correlation to all that technology we’re using.  Have you chucked that Smartphone across the room yet?  When you finally give in to the need for a tech detox vacation, a week of adventure, exploring and new experiences will bring you the best kind of sleep you can imagine, especially if it’s under the stars, on a beach, with the calming sound of the river in the background.

And fair warning, it might take a few days to reach the point of total bliss I’m talking about, but you’ll see…a device-free getaway is the single best rejuvenation session there is.  Your mind, body and soul will thank you.

 

How do you know when it’s time to unplug?  Chime in below with a meltdown moment that inspired you to take a vacation.

Cari Morgan
Cari Morgan is O.A.R.S.' Communications Specialist (a.k.a. the voice of O.A.R.S.). She lives and plays in the Sierra Foothills.
  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1666243291 Mariah Hibarger

    Interestingly enough, last summer a group of neuroscientists took a week long rafting trip in Utah with the sole purpose of analyzing their own brains when there was no choice but to unplug. This Terry Gross interview of Matt Richtel, the technology journalist at the New York Times, talks about what those scientists discovered. Not surprisingly, it’s a good thing to take frequent breaks from our screens (I say as I type this): http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129384107