7 Things You Probably Don’t Know About the Grand Canyon

Sep 30, 2013

7 Things You Probably Don’t Know About the Grand Canyon

Fun Facts About One of Earth’s Greatest Wonders

  • At nearly 6,000 feet deep, you could stack four Empire State Buildings within the deepest part of the Grand Canyon and still have some room to spare.  How can you not want to see it from the river after that mind-boggling stat?
  • Thelma and Louise famously drive their car off a cliff into the Grand Canyon, but at least 15 other Hollywood favorites like National Lampoon’s Vacation, Into the Wild and Transformers also give screen time to this iconic location.
  • Nearly two billion years of the Earth’s geological history has been exposed in the Grand Canyon as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock. But sorry dino hunters, you won’t find any bones here.  This geologic paradise is so old that it predates our dinosaur friends.
  • The beach below the canyon’s infamous Lava Falls is unofficially called “Tequila Beach.”  You can probably guess why. Celebrations are mandatory after rafting through this doozy.

Grand Canyon rafting

  • 800 million gallons of water (per hour!) pump through the Grand Canyon’s 277 river miles and 160 rapids.
  • The north rim is 1,200 feet higher than the south rim, so don’t curl up in your sleeping bag close to the edge because the Grand Canyon is technically tilted.
  • John Wesley Powell, the famous explorer who led the first expedition down the Colorado River through the canyon in 1869, is responsible for giving the Grand Canyon its name.

Sources: wowthatsinteresting.com, venere.com, sciencekidz.co.nz

 

Related Articles:

The Emerald Mile: Best Adventure Book Ever?

They Call Me Groover Boy

True Tales of the Fastest Boat Ride Through the Grand Canyon (Ever) 

The Grand Canyon Dory–A Colorado River Legend

 

Cari Morgan
Cari Morgan is O.A.R.S.' Communications Specialist (a.k.a. the voice of O.A.R.S.). She lives and plays in the Sierra Foothills.
  • Gordo

    Very nice article!. I especially liked the nod to the “Tequila Beach” tradition. A few other “Lava Falls” traditions I’ve noticed are, kissing “Vucan’s Anvil” a mile above the rapid to assure a safe passage through the rapid and everyone in the party painting their toenails the night before for good luck. Also there’s the traditional “Alive Below Lava” party to celebrate having survived the rapid the evening after passing “Lava”.

    Thankfully the tradition of leaving an offering on the anvil seems to have faded from popularity, somebody has to recover those things.

    • Cari_Morgan

      Thanks, Gordo! Love that you shared a few other river traditions.